• First Health Associates
  • 415 E Golf Rd, Suite 120, Arlington Hts, IL
  • 1-847-593-3330
HOW TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE AND ACUPUNCTURE WORK
5 (100%) 6 vote[s]
    • 30 JAN 19
    • 0
    HOW TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE AND ACUPUNCTURE WORK

    HOW TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE AND ACUPUNCTURE WORK

    HOW TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE AND ACUPUNCTURE WORK
    5 (100%) 6 vote[s]

     The goal of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is to restore integrity to the body’s systems.  Scholar, researcher, author Yu Zhu, MD(China) explains TCM.

    By:  Dr. Yu Zhu, LAc, MD (China)

    The overall premise behind Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is that the body is a system that is interconnected.  The entire anatomical structure is connected physically, functionally and emotionally.

    Traditional Chinese Medicine reviews your symptoms and looks for organ systems that are functioning at less than optimal capacity to direct treatment. Once identified these organ systems are stimulated or suppressed using both acupuncture and herbal medicines.  Restoring normal system function helps to alleviate the symptoms and offers a better long-term option.

    VITAL ORGANS IN TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE

    Rather than view an internal organ as a fixed anatomical structure, TCM sees each “organ” as having several interconnected functions and processes associated with it. In TCM, when there is disharmony attributed to a vital organ such as the spleen, it can cause symptoms of bloating or loss of appetite rather than a disease of the actual anatomical spleen.

    TCM includes two categories of organs, either solid or hollow. In this system, each “solid” organ produces substances and functions in tandem with another “hollow” organ that receives and processes that substance. Each of the five vital solid organs – the heart, lung, spleen, liver and kidney – is respectively paired with the hollow organs of the small intestine, large intestine, stomach, gallbladder and urinary bladder.

     

     EMOTIONS TIED TO VITAL ORGANS IN TCM

     In Chinese medicine, each of the five vital organs is also associated with a primary emotion.  These emotions – anger, sadness, joy, pensiveness and fear – are profoundly affected by the organ matched with them.

    In this complex energy system, bodily functions are connected with emotions, sensory and thought experiences, as well as spiritual elements. Additionally, in TCM each organ is associated with a particular weather condition so that the heart, lung, liver and kidney are respectively tied with heat, dryness, wind, dampness and cold.

    When considered together, this companion system of organs, emotions and climatic elements provides an extensive means for diagnostic tools available to the TCM practitioner. One of the most powerful strengths of TCM is its ability to detect and recognize disharmonies in someone’s health.  As a result, practitioners can customize treatments accordingly to bring about long-term health improvements.

    The theory behind Traditional Chinese Medicine in health restoration opens up unlimited possibilities in condition treatment.  Some of the more common conditions addressed with TCM can be seen here. 

    Since 1981, First Health Associates has been providing exceptional health care to residents of Arlington Heights, Mt. Prospect, Schaumburg, Buffalo Grove, Rolling Meadows, Palatine, Elk Grove and Des Plaines.  Our Arlington Heights acupuncturist is rated one of the best in the Chicagoland area.  First Health is an integrative medicine practice that offers:  Medical Care; Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine; Counseling and Behavioral Therapy; and Chiropractic Care.

     

    Dr. Yu Zhu, LAc, MD (China) has more than 30 years’ experience as an acupuncturist.  Learn more about the conditions Dr. Zhu treats.

     

     

    Leave a reply →