• What could be causing my knee pain?

    Most knee pain is caused by some sort of arthritis, most often osteoarthritis.  However, in some cases, it could be caused by ACL, meniscus, or ligament injuries.

  • How can I tell the difference between pain from injury and arthritis pain?

    If you have had some sort of trauma to the knee, it’s likely that your pain is caused by some sort of sprain or tear.  With arthritis, it’s more of a dull, aching pain that usually gets worse as time goes on.

  • How can I relieve my knee pain?

    For minor pain caused by injury or arthritis flare up, you should rest the knee and keep it elevated.  Taking over-the-counter pain relievers and applying ice can also help reduce the inflammation and pain.  If the pain doesn’t improve or gets worse after a few days, consider seeing a doctor that specializes in knee pain.

  • What is osteoarthritis?

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease.   It is often referred to as the “wear and tear” disease because it develops over time and can worsen due to prior injuries.  Osteoarthritis occurs when the cartilage between the bones begins to wear down. Without the healthy cartilage, bones will rub together, causing pain, inflammation, and loss of motion.

  • Who gets osteoarthritis?

    Although osteoarthritis typically occurs in people over 60, younger people can get osteoarthritis primarily from past injuries or repetitive joint stress from overuse.

  • What is the difference between osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis?

    Osteoarthritis does not involve an autoimmune process like rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is less common and occurs when the body’s immune system attacks the joints, causing fluid to accumulate within the joint. The fluid buildup causes stiffness, fatigue, and soreness. However, mild inflammation and pain occurs in both diseases.

  • What are the risk factors for osteoarthritis?

    There are several known risk factors, including age, obesity, nutrition, family history, injury, and hormone levels.

  • What are the symptoms of osteoarthritis?

    The most common symptoms include pain, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, inflammation, crackling sounds, and limited range of motion.

  • How can I treat arthritis in my knee?

    The first priority is to provide relief from your pain.  This is often achieved through pharmaceutical remedies in the short-term.   If you’ve tried over-the-counter pain medications without success, another option is a series of Synvisc injections.  Synvisc supplements the fluid in your knee to help lubricate and cushion the joint.  It is typically administered in a three-shot series, spaced one week apart.

  • What is Synvisc?

    Synvisc is a gel-like mixture that contains hyaluronan, a natural substance found in the body that acts like a shock absorber for the joints.  The good news is that most people start feeling relief soon after the injection and report little to no side effects.

  • Do the injections hurt?

    Your knee will be numbed before the injection so you shouldn’t feel any pain.

  • Can I resume my regular activities right after an injection?

    No.  You should avoid strenuous activity or prolonged weight-bearing activities for approximately 48 hours following an injection.  Each person is different, so your doctor should discuss any additional limitations with you.

  • Once I get initial relief, is there any way to keep the pain from coming back?

    Once your pain is eliminated or reduced, the next step is to determine its cause. This is where First Health’s integrative, non-surgical approach makes all the difference.   Once the cause has been determined, we will develop a personalized care plan for long-term pain relief and treatment of the acute or chronic conditions that cause your pain.  A variety of alternative therapies have proven effective in the treatment of knee pain, including chiropractic, acupuncture, and diet and lifestyle modifications.   We will work closely with you to find a lasting solution to your knee pain.